2019-20 Programme

All talks, presentations and meetings are open to visitors and are held in the Cramphorn Theatre, Fairfield Road, starting at 7:45 pm. There is no need to book but there is a nominal charge of £3 for members and £5 for visitors, payable on the night.

All outings leave from outside the theatre. Group members will have received booking terms and instructions with their Newsletter.

Parking is via Coval Lane only. Charges apply.

Close


“My journey as a designer”
Report by Keith Otter


Outing to Stamford and Belvoir Castle


Outing to Compton Verney and West Wycombe
Report by Keith Otter


Outing to Herstmonceux Castle


Outing to Sutton Hoo and Lavenham
Report by Keith Otter


Group holiday centred on York


Talk on the history of the Petre family
Pay on the door


Outing to Wakehurst Place and Quebec House
Places available


Talk on David Parr House, Cambridge
Pay on the door


“From Crime Scene to Art Photographer”
Pay on the door


“I need a lifestyle adviser”
Pay on the door


Talk on Thomas Hardy and the National Trust
Pay on the door


Talk on bridges, triumphs and disasters
Pay on the door


Annual General Meeting
Pay on the door


Talk on Eastbury Manor
Pay on the door


Outing to Stamford and Belvoir Castle

Previous event

Stamford

Stamford is a town on the River Welland in Lincolnshire which has 17th and 18th century stone buildings, as well as timber framed houses and five medieval churches. It is a picturesque and unspoilt little town, full of character. The facades of the houses in the town are favourites of film and TV producers, and were used as “Meryton” in Pride and Prejudice. Look out for The George, which is one of England’s greatest coaching Inns, as well as hidden courtyards that are home to speciality shops, cafés and pubs.

Belvoir Castle

A large Elizabethan building

Belvoir Castle is the ancestral home of the Dukes of Rutland. The family have lived at Belvoir in an unbroken line for almost 1,000 years. Built on a hill, its turrets and towers rise over the Vale of Belvoir like an illustration in a romantic fairy-tale. It is the fourth castle to be built on the site, finished in 1832 closely resembling the original romantic Gothic style designed by James Wyatt, and is now designated as a Grade I building. There are lavish staterooms, the principle ones being the Elizabeth Saloon, the Regents Gallery and the State Dining Room. The Castle was recently the venue for Phil Spencer’s Stately Homes TV programme; it looked an amazing place.

The formal gardens include the Duchess Garden which contains a “root and moss’ house - restored in 2014 - and a Japanese Woodland Garden containing magnolias, rhododendrons and camellias. When plans for the grounds drawn up by Capability Brown were discovered in the recent past, they were brought to fruition by the Duchess of Rutland, with new areas now open to the public. The Castle Tea Room serves sandwiches, cakes and hot drinks.

Next event